CPAP as a possible asthma treatment?

I came across this article tonight where continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines are being used to treat asthma

CPAP for asthma – http://www.news4jax.com/news/cpap-for-asthma/25308408

This is interesting to me for several reasons, and it reminds me of one of my ER visits last year where the respiratory techs, there were two working together that night, asked if I used a CPAP and if it ever helps when my asthma is acting up.

CPAP machines are generally prescribed to those suffering from sleep apnea.  They force air into your respiratory tract through a mask that covers some or all of your face.  The air forces your airways to stay open helping the patient to breathe better, sleep better, stay asleep, and keep their oxygen levels from dropping.  Another treatment option for some suffering from sleep apnea is surgery to cut away extra tissue and open up the airways.  While this may work for some, it’s not a guaranteed treatment and has the risk of complications.  This is why using a CPAP machine while sleeping is a relative easy and effective solution.

Many asthmatics take one if not many medications to help control their condition.  Those with asthma often have secondary conditions (such as GERD, obstructive sleep apnea, allergies, high blood pressure, hay fever, sinusitis, rhinitis, vocal chord dysfunction, and anxiety or mood disorders) that work together to complicate everything.  These medications have side effects that can sometimes make one feel just as bad as not taking the medication.  An easy treatment such as a CPAP could be a great solution for some.

I’m not sure on all the details of this study, but being an asthmatic who also has obstructive sleep apnea, I wonder if any of those being studied have both conditions.  The good news is the American Lung Association (ALA) is involved and it sounds like they are looking for people to participate in the study.

ALA Research protocols currently recruiting – http://www.lung.org/finding-cures/our-research/acrc/protocols-recruiting.html

  • jules marsh

    I’ve been on CPAP in hospital to avoid the intubation. I found it very uncomfortable and claustrophobic having the mask so tight to my face. However, it did keep me breathing and meant not having to be put on a ventilator.

    • I wear a CPAP every night so it doesn’t seem like a big deal to me. I don’t wear a full face mask though. I don’t think I’d like that.