Archive for July 2017

Life on oxygen

I’ve been on supplemental oxygen for over a month now and love it. Yes, it’s a bit of a pain to drag the stuff around with me, or be tethered by a tube in the house, but it has allowed to reclaim a part of my life. In this time I have:

  • Gone to a multi-day family function/reunion
  • Went to a triple-feature Planet of the Apes feature at my local theater
  • Gone grocery shopping several times walking up and down all the aisles while pushing the cart
  • Cleaned the house
  • Gone into work for more than a couple hours
  • Walked around Oakland in Pittsburgh
  • Done yard-work outside the house
  • Carried 50-lb bags of chicken feed

I’m sure I’m forgetting things, but I think you get the point. I’ve gone from someone who was functionally home-bound to more of what I look like – an able-bodied adult.

Like most people on oxygen, I was started off with a home oxygen concentrator and a couple small tanks. The concentrator had a refiller attachment that allowed me to refill the tanks I was given. This was quite handy as I didn’t have to pick up or wait on delivery for tanks on a regular basis. The downside was the concentrator/refiller made a lot of noise and heat. It made so much heat it was confusing the thermostat in the house drastically affecting the temperature of our air conditioning. The tanks I had also contained only 90 min of air each preventing me from going too far outside the house.

After a couple weeks I was given a pulse regulator for my tanks. Continuous regulators just release oxygen as soon as they are opened, whether you are actually breathing it in or not. The pulse regulator released oxygen only when I inhaled. This effectively extended the life on my tanks by almost fourfold. The one downside with this new setup was I used the oxygen up as quickly as I breathed it. If I was sitting down or being relatively inactive my oxygen seemingly lasted forever, but if I was walking around or carrying things it was a different story.

Another couple weeks later I called my oxygen provider to inquire about arrangements for flying on a plane. I should preface this by saying my original oxygen provider was bought out a week or so into my use, and the new provider wasn’t too keen on customer service. The representative I spoke with on the phone insisted they would do nothing to provide oxygen for me on the plane. This is a bit of a problem because oxygen tanks are not allowed on commercial flights, and airlines do not allow you to connect to their emergency oxygen system anymore due to “security risks” after September 11, 2001. My provider should have either loaned or rented a personal oxygen concentrator (POC) with batteries provided 150% the time of my flight as required per airlines regulations. I complained to my pulmonologist who agreed this was ridiculous (this wasn’t my first complaint with the oxygen provider), and suggested I switch to Inogen.

Inogen is a manufacturer of oxygen equipment, provides its equipment directly to consumers (like me), and happen to have the most universally accepted POC for commercial flights. Last week I spoke with the local Inogen representative on the phone and two days later they were at my home with all new equipment. My new home conentrator is 1/3 the size, puts off virtually no heat, and makes much less noise. The Inogen One G3 personal oxygen concentrator allows me to walk around the house easily, go outside, go shopping, go to the movie theater, travel in my car, etc. with much ease and convenience. It weighs less than 5 pounds, has 8-9 hours of battery life, and I can get more batteries if needed.

I feel like things are looking up. I still feel worn out constantly, but I am much more physically active than I have been the past 12 months. People are also nice to you when they see you have breathing problems. That’s the problem with invisible illness, you’re sometimes treated poorly because strangers think you’re being lazy or demanding. People want to hold doors for me, carry things to my car, I’ve even received discounts at gas stations when buying a fountain drink or snacks. I’m hoping to continue increasing my physical activity to strengthen my respiratory system.