Tag Archive for pulse oximeter

Pulmonary Hypertention Part 2

After looking for pulmonary hypertention (PH) since 2010, the last echo showed a significant increase in pressure. My doctor didn’t specifically say I have PH, but he added it to my list of conditions. It also appeared on the list of “what ails me” when I was in the hospital. Since March or May the following symptoms have become more frequent:

  • Short of breath
  • Low oxygen saturation
  • Coughing
  • Headaches
  • Dizzy or lightheaded
  • Chest pressure
  • Chest pain
  • Wheezing
  • Heart racing or pounding
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Swelling in extremities / retaining water

This doesn’t feel like asthma. I talked to my doctor about it today and he suggested pulmonary rehabilitation. I think that’s a great idea, but am not confident it’ll fix everything. I have had a long string of exacerbations, infection, exacerbations, hospitalized, more infections, etc. So yes, I have had problem after problem this year. What’s been most concerning is how everything wears me out and leaves me panting. Yesterday I put my pulse oximeter on and went outside to get the mail. My oxygen saturation went from 95% to 89%. I repeated it today and went from 95% to 87%. We’re not talking about a hike or any sort of elevation here. I’m just walking at a normal pace to the end of my driveway and back.

The only thing that seems to really help is my CPAP. If I’m struggling to breathe and feeling a lot of chest pressure/pain, an hour or so on CPAP will give me some relief. The past seven days I’ve spent an average of 12hrs a day on CPAP. I don’t know what I’d do without that machine.

I talked to my doctor at UPMC and they want me to see someone at the Pulmonary Hypertension Center there. Unfortunately I probably can’t get it paired with my appointment next week, but I think it’s a good idea to see a specialist. I just need to be able to function without feeling like I’m gonna keel over. In the meantime I’ve been doing a lot of reading and making some new online friends.

Asthma bag to the rescue

For years I’ve been carrying asthma-related things everywhere I go.  At first it was an inhaler or two in a pocket which eventually upgraded into a backpack, and now is my Maxpedition Jumbo Versipack.  I need many more things than a pocket or two on my pants can carry and putting everything into an easy bag with both a handle and shoulder strap makes it all the more easier.  I went to my main doctor today to follow up from the hospital trips last week and the nurse wasn’t sure where their pulse oximeter was.  Lo and behold I keep one with me at all times so she used it instead.

My man-bag, asthma-purse, asthma-bag, satchel, what-have-you regularly contains:

Maxepedition Jumbo Versipack Khaki/Foliage

Maxepedition Jumbo Versipack Khaki/Foliage

  • Maxpedition Jumbo Versipack
    • Pari Trek S nebulizer with AC adapter, car adapter and battery pack
    • Pari LC Sprint Nebulizer with wing-tip tubing
    • Albuterol .083% nebulizer solution
    • Peakflow meter
    • Nonin 9590 pulse oximeter
    • Cetirizine (Zyrtec)
    • Patanase
    • Current and last year’s asthma journals
    • Bandana
    • Pocket knife
    • CRKT large spork
    • Sunglasses in hard clamshell case
    • Black and blue ballpoint pens
    • iPad VGA and HDMI connectors
Contents of my asthma bag

Contents of my asthma bag

So this is what I’m lugging around all the time and my bag is by no means stuffed.  There’s always room to stash some business papers, grab a couple notebooks or even slide an iPad3 into one of the pockets.  Obviously I’d need to take a couple things out to go through TSA, but overall it’s something easy to always have ready and take with me.

CMS50L Pulse Oximeter – Review

Back in May I decided I wanted a pulse oximeter handy just to check my oxygen saturation. Often times I would feel absolutely awful and this is one way I could track symptoms. This was before I had been diagnosed with severe obstructive apnea, and was something that could help me tell my doctors my oxygen levels drop when lying down a certain way.

So where to start….I decided to go to Amazon and look to see what they had. If you’ve ever had your oxygen tested in the hospital or at a doctor’s office, there’s a good chance a handheld device was used. These cost about $400-$500 and aren’t something most people buy to use at home. You can get the smaller devices that just clip onto your fingertip for much less. They start around $20 and range up to $200 or more.

I looked around, found one between $20-$30 and saw that it had decent reviews on Amazon. By decent I mean it had a 4 out of 5 stars. Usually this isn’t too bad. I read some of the bad/poor reviews and saw some were pissed off with the device. I’m used to purchasing computer parts and other electronics and you always see these reviews. I didn’t think much of it and purchased the CMS50L Pulse Oximeter. Even though it wasn’t the best thing out there, I thought for $20 I couldn’t go wrong.

The device arrived in the mail and seemed to work great.  It takes two AAA batteries, and would be easy to replace.  Whenever Liz tried the device out, it showed her at 98 or 99%.  When I tried it out I would be anywhere from 90 to 97%.  This made complete sense because of how I was doing at the time.  I did notice it always started out at 97%, and often eventually got there, but I didn’t think much of it at the time.

Fast forward a month or so and that is when the oximeter fell off my nightstand onto the ground.  Shouldn’t be a big deal since there was carpet and the fall was all of 36″, but that’s when the thing started acting weird all the time.  It started “freaking out,” not taking readings, would reset randomly, and occasionally gave really odd readings. I often had to hold the device shut on my finger just for it to work.  The device always start at 97% and if I wore it long enough, would often get back up to 97%.  As time has passed, the pulse oximeter has become more and more sketchy and I figured it was time to get something different.  I went back to Amazon and took a closer look at those reviews.

For starters the company who fulfilled my order was Clinical Guard.  They had a customer satisfaction rate between 95% which I thought this was pretty good at the time.  It’s currently down at 91% which actually isn’t very good at all.  This made me start wondering why people aren’t happy with their purchases.

I then looked back at some of the user reviews for the device, especially the bad ones.  I started noticing all my complaints were listed in those bad reviews.  It seemed as if  some of those good reviews were written too soon or maybe the users never compared the readings to a calibrated device with a medical professional.  Another common thread was all problems starting about a month after use.  Since my oxygen levels have been documented by medical professionals in the 70s, I’d like to have a device that gives me accurate results.  Sometimes this is how I determine whether to go to the hospital or stay home.

Apparently the Nonin models are the cadillacs of oximeters.  The low end model is around $100 and the mid-range recommended model is about $200.  I’d really like to avoid spending $100 right now, so I found another one made by Concord for $40.  Even though this is another relatively cheap product, there are some big differences between it and what I currently have.  The reviews are almost all positive and it is sold by it’s manufacturer Concord Health Supply.  I check their customer satisfaction rating and they’re at 100%.  The only negative reviews of the item are by medical professionals saying it’s not as perfect as their high-end, expensive devices at work.  I can live with that.  So I ordered one last night.  I have high hopes it’ll work out better and will let you know how it compares.